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Albany to Perth

...via Denmark, Bunbury etc.

semi-overcast 25 °C
View Sam Smart in World War II & Back to Oz on SteveJD's travel map.

Albany is a lovely town in a great position and it is not too surprising that a number of European explorers visited over the years, although it is surprising that, other than the excellent harbour, they were otherwise unimpressed. In 1627, Dutchman Francois Thijssen sailed by and made maps of the area. There was apparently no interest as a result of his exploration as it was not until 1791 that the British navigator, George Vancouver, visited. Although he too was not impressed he named a number of the natural features including Oyster Harbour, King George the Third Sound (now known as King George Sound) and Princess Royal Harbour as the day he provided all the names was the anniversary of the birth of Princess Charlotte's birth. Ten years later, Matthew Flinders visited the area followed by the French explorer, Nicholas Baudin in 1803. The British became concerned that the French would 'jump their claim' but it took until 1826 before the brig Amity entered the harbour with a small complement of troops.

Replica of the brig Amity

Replica of the brig Amity

The following year it was officially proclaimed as Frederick's Town after Frederick Augustus, Duke of York and Albany. He was the 'Grand Old Duke of York' in the children's ditty. In 1832 the name was changed to Albany in honour of the same person.

The main thing we wanted to look at in Albany (which we had visited a few times before over the years) was the new National Anzac Centre on Mount Adelaide. It was a little more expensive than other similar places and we gave up on the audio guide (which we understood was being phased out). That aside, this is a brilliant centre with excellent displays and good use of technology.

National Anzac Centre

National Anzac Centre

Trooper and his horse statue

Trooper and his horse statue

Silhouettes of marching troops on the window of Garrison Restaurant

Silhouettes of marching troops on the window of Garrison Restaurant

Outside the centre is a display of naval weaponry which was quite interesting and then there is a path up Convoy Walk to the top of Mt Adelaide. On the walk up and down we saw a nice variety of wildlife.

I believe the mountain was named after King William IV's wife, Queen Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, a good old English name!

Some of the Naval weaponry - deactivated!

Some of the Naval weaponry - deactivated!

White-breasted Robin

White-breasted Robin

King's Skink

King's Skink

Golden Whistler

Golden Whistler

Red-capped Parrot

Red-capped Parrot

Panoramic view over King George Sound from Mt Adelaide

Panoramic view over King George Sound from Mt Adelaide

At the top there are gun emplacements from World War II and information boards showing how the fleet would have been moored waiting to take troops to World War I. There are also underground areas showing how the shells would have been stored and used.

The fleet would have been an impressive sight judging from this board

The fleet would have been an impressive sight judging from this board

Naval gun on Mt Adelaide

Naval gun on Mt Adelaide

Some of the display of shells in the arsenal below ground

Some of the display of shells in the arsenal below ground

From the mount, we drove down to Lake Seppings and enjoyed a late afternoon walk around the lake. As noted above, the British took control of the region in 1826 when Major Edmund Lockyer planted the British flag. He found this body of water and named it after his cousins Sir Robert and John Milligen Seppings. Researching this has enlightened me as to the origins of the Seppings, almost on my doorstep in Suffolk. Their name is believed to originate from a nickname 'Sevenpence', meaning someone short in stature!

And we didn't see one!

And we didn't see one!

Female Superb Blue Fairy-wren

Female Superb Blue Fairy-wren

A green Treefrog

A green Treefrog

Western Australian Bluebell shrub

Western Australian Bluebell shrub

White-faced Heron

White-faced Heron

Late afternoon reflections

Late afternoon reflections

On our second and, unfortunately, last day in Albany we went down to the ANZAC Peace Park which is very nicely laid out by the harbour with Lone Pine Grove planted with pines from Lone Pine at Gallipoli.

ANZAC Peace Park sign

ANZAC Peace Park sign

Seahorse mural on silo by harbour

Seahorse mural on silo by harbour

Jetty into the harbour by the Peace Park

Jetty into the harbour by the Peace Park

And a pelican came flying by

And a pelican came flying by

Little Pied Cormorant perching nicely for Judith

Little Pied Cormorant perching nicely for Judith

Judith on her way back from a photographic foray

Judith on her way back from a photographic foray

Two of the pines from Lone Pine

Two of the pines from Lone Pine

Back in town we found a good lookout point from which we could see the impressive Albany Entertainment Centre and other attractive buildings and features before heading back to sort ourselves out ready for the off tomorrow.

Albany Entertainment Centre

Albany Entertainment Centre

An old building now part of the University of Western Australia

An old building now part of the University of Western Australia

An attractive formal garden near the foreshore

An attractive formal garden near the foreshore

In the evening we met up with another of Judith's relatives, Lisa's sister Kim, and enjoyed an evening BBQ at Emu Point with her and her sons Lukas, Blake and Ethan. Unfortunately, we didn't get to meet Kim's husband Daniel as he was working in Hopetoun.

On a less fine Thursday we drove west through Denmark, detouring to Green's Pool and Madfish Bay but no photos from here as it was dull and damp. We got to the Valley of the Giants (the giants being huge Tingle trees) and were a bit disappointed to find how commercialised this has become but we did find a nice place for a picnic lunch among the tingles.

e4e4fb70-c03d-11e8-9387-13474368505c.jpgSteve and Judith with the Beast at the picnic spot

Steve and Judith with the Beast at the picnic spot

After lunch we took some side roads to get down to Ficifolia Road where, in a previous life, we had found lovely Beaufortia squarrosa flowering and were delighted to find many flowering shrubs in the coastal bush. From here it was a winding road roughly northwest to Bridgetown where we enjoyed an overnight stay with Bill & Judy with whom we had stayed at the start of this trip.

Mixed bush along the road

Mixed bush along the road

Many Beaufortia scattered among the bush

Many Beaufortia scattered among the bush

A Beaufortia squarrosa bush

A Beaufortia squarrosa bush

The flower of the Beaufortia squarrosa

The flower of the Beaufortia squarrosa

An unidentified pea flower

An unidentified pea flower

The Beast on the road to Bridgetown

The Beast on the road to Bridgetown

On the way to Perth we stopped at Balingup Country Park which is lovely but the autumn colours had not quite started in earnest, still a recommended place if you are in the area. At Judy's suggestion, we stopped in Kirup to get fruit and veg at Newy's Veggie Store, really excellent local produce. We picked up some Rocky Road at Donnybrook (as was our custom in the past) and drove on to Bunbury where we stopped for lunch at the Dolphin Discovery Centre and saw a few dolphins in the sea just outside afterwards. The Centre is well worth a visit if you are in the area. Our route then took us up the coast to Rockingham where we had afternoon coffee with Judith's 365Project friend Merrelyn and her husband Graham.

Newy's Veggie Store

Newy's Veggie Store

The Dolphin Discovery Centre

The Dolphin Discovery Centre

Dolphins just outside the Centre

Dolphins just outside the Centre

In Perth we stayed in a lovely apartment at West End Apartments in West Perth. It was well equipped and roomy but we did find that we had to street park rather expensively as the Beast was too big to fit in the allocated parking spot! Fortunately for our budget, we had a Gumtree buyer who took the Beast off our hands (amid much wailing and gnashing of teeth!) within a couple of days of our arrival in the smoke.

Farewell to the Beast

Farewell to the Beast

Several days were taken up with collecting a hire car, shopping (among other things, a new suitcase was needed as one of the ones we brought broke on the flight to Perth) and catching up with friends but we did find time for an afternoon walk in King's Park, still as lovely as ever with great views over Perth and South Perth and the Swan. Also walked through West Perth to Subiaco and back, seeing many lovely old buildings preserved in spite of the gentrification of these suburbs.

West End Apartments in West Perth

West End Apartments in West Perth

A colourful mural

A colourful mural

An attractive Art Deco building - I think it was a cinema

An attractive Art Deco building - I think it was a cinema

A view along Rokeby Road, Subiaco

A view along Rokeby Road, Subiaco

Subiaco Hotel

Subiaco Hotel

b9d2a5b0-c040-11e8-82f6-ab98518f71fd.jpgA couple of sunset shots from our apartment balcony

A couple of sunset shots from our apartment balcony

6e72baa0-c041-11e8-82f6-ab98518f71fd.jpgRainbow Lorikeets were amusing company in the palm trees outside the apartment

Rainbow Lorikeets were amusing company in the palm trees outside the apartment

Early in April we were delighted to be invited to the 80th birthday lunch for very good friend Len Stewart and met more of his family (some we already knew).

Len with one of his sons and his daughter plus lovely big cake

Len with one of his sons and his daughter plus lovely big cake

Posted by SteveJD 09:09 Archived in Australia Tagged australia anzac perth albany bunbury forest_of_the_giants

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